Vertical BathtubVertical Bathtub

Shower enclosure. Barring a door mount a tiled half wall may be the next best thing. You'll barely have to open the door to access your towel. In this particular shower the shower head and drain are far enough from the exit that you won't have to drench your floors to reach for that towel.

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Bathtub LinersBathtub Liners

The exhibitionist. Some people thrive on attention and dream of finding fame and fortune on the stage. In this bathroom you have permission to sing at full volume in the shower put on a show and dance as if everyone is watching.

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Outdoor BathtubOutdoor Bathtub

Define vanity space. A long towel bar spans the length of this vanity and defines stations at the trough sink. Since the vanity is floating it makes sense to nest the bar squarely underneath it so that it doesn't protrude against the legs of those using the sink.

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Vintage BathtubVintage Bathtub

The bold and the beautiful. Bright colors aren't for everyone but if you have a favorite what are you afraid of? Attention-getting tangerine orange in a powder room is sure to be a talking point and it will cheer up anyone who enters. When a shade of green is this juicy why not blanket your bathroom with it? The bank of mirrored cabinets amplifies the natural light coming into the space and there's just enough wood to prevent all that green from going into overload. Architect Scott Weston isn't shy when it comes to color. In fact Weston sees color as a powerful tool that can set a home apart. This all-blue bathroom is far from cookie-cutter. The frameless shower screen and minimalist sink allow the tiles to be the main event without competition. In the same project — an addition to an 1880s Victorian in Sydney — this bathroom delivers the same quirky twist through the use of another unexpected color.

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Bathtub Safety BarBathtub Safety Bar

Inside the shower. If you're sensitive to the cold and would rather have every single shower accouterment at your fingertips the instant you turn the water off a towel rack inside the shower stall might be right for you. If you want to pull this off it helps to have either a longer-than-standard-size shower stall or a rainfall shower that will be less likely to splash and get your dry towel wet.

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Waterfall Bathtub FaucetWaterfall Bathtub Faucet

Whose towel is whose. Alternatively you could employ the same strategy of demarcating sink space even without a trough basin by mounting your towel bars just under the lip of the countertop. Especially in a guest room or kid's shared bathroom this makes it easier to identify whose towel is whose compared with a catchall hook mounted somewhere on the wall.

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Teak NightstandTeak Nightstand

Simple circulation. Try to keep your circulation on one side of the room. Hotels do a great job of this. There's a reason 90 percent of hotels have the same floor plan: because it's simple and it works. Circulation plans become a little more challenging with en suite rooms (bedrooms with bathrooms attached) or bedrooms that have doors to the outside. To save on space pay attention to where you locate the bathroom and closet in your bedroom. Rooms that have bathroom or closet access before the sleeping area require a longer hall (see the left-hand plan). If you organize the circulation so the bathroom and closet are accessed through the sleeping area (right-hand plan) you don't need a separate hall and you can add the circulation space into the room to make it feel larger too.

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Bathtub RingBathtub Ring

The rebel. We're all forced to toe the line to some degree — there are laws to follow jobs to show up for and cultural norms to abide by after all. But if a part of you wants to walk your own path a symbol in your bathroom can serve as a reminder to stand up for what you believe in and that you can dance to your own tune … at least to a degree.

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