Typical Nightstand HeightTypical Nightstand Height

Consider the furniture layout. Your bedroom's architecture should take your furniture into account. Bedroom floor plans usually have a bed wall — but what about dressers nightstands TVs chairs and a desk? Work with your architect or designer to make sure there is enough space beside the bed for nightstands and ample circulation so you can access three sides of the mattress.

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Platform Bed With NightstandsPlatform Bed With Nightstands

This easy styling trick is perfect for renters or decorators short on time. You don't need to mount oversized art — just lean the frame against the wall. This has the bonus of adding to the relaxed effortless feel we're going for in this room. I like to work with oversized prints and frames as they're a little bit unexpected and draw your attention.

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Mahogany NightstandMahogany Nightstand

A nice way to mix and match furnishings is to unify them with a common hue. In this space the lamps differ in height and style but the color green is what allows them to "speak" to each other. On either side of this bed you'll see that the nightstands and artwork are different. However equity is created because the height on both sides is the same. This type of symmetry is not always necessary but visual balance does help to make a room feel more comfortable for some people.

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Nightstands And DressersNightstands And Dressers

Color pops. Liven up a plain bedroom with an accent wall covered in fabulously bold wallpaper. For the truly fearless choose a contrasting color (like the yellow here against the peacock blue wall) for the bedside tables and cushions. If you prefer to limit your pop to one place choose a white or wood headboard and tables and layer on neutral (but deliciously textured) bedding.

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Freestanding BathtubFreestanding Bathtub

Material Considerations. Glass thickness the thicker the glass the more durable your door or screen will be. If you are worried about it breaking the most glass doors and screens are made with tempered glass so that you won't have tiny shards in the bathroom if the glass does crack or break. Glass style: While clear glass is the most popular you also can find etched or frosted glass. Glass height: The top of the glass should go up at least to the top of the shower head. Hardware style: A glass screen or frameless glass door requires little hardware compared with a sliding or framed glass door. Clients often opt to use the same hardware finish as the shower head and tub faucet.

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Pottery Barn NightstandPottery Barn Nightstand

Imagine walking into your bedroom and seeing clear clean surfaces. The bedcovers are smooth and inviting the pillows are plumped and on your nightstand is nothing but a vase of fresh flowers a candle a cup of herbal tea and your journal and pen. Any clothing has been easily put away because it fits within your dresser and closet space with room to spare. If you have children imagine finally coming into this beautiful space closing the door behind you and enjoying a few moments of blissful peace and quiet.

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Toddler NightstandToddler Nightstand

Are you at a loss for what type of night stand to purchase? First consider how much space you have. If you have a small bedroom think about ways that your night stands can serve another function. A table for a nearby armchair or a small chest of drawers for clothes storage are two convenient options. Allow room for table lamps or install wall mounted sconces to read by. I am a firm believer in the power of drawers - they make your life easier less cluttered and more functional. At the very least try to find a table with a shelf to stash your magazines and books.

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Slim NightstandSlim Nightstand

Simple circulation. Try to keep your circulation on one side of the room. Hotels do a great job of this. There's a reason 90 percent of hotels have the same floor plan: because it's simple and it works. Circulation plans become a little more challenging with en suite rooms (bedrooms with bathrooms attached) or bedrooms that have doors to the outside. To save on space pay attention to where you locate the bathroom and closet in your bedroom. Rooms that have bathroom or closet access before the sleeping area require a longer hall (see the left-hand plan). If you organize the circulation so the bathroom and closet are accessed through the sleeping area (right-hand plan) you don't need a separate hall and you can add the circulation space into the room to make it feel larger too.

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